Lewisham Council rapped by Ombudsman for not consulting mother of autistic boys

Mother was not allowed any kind of input into care review of her two sons

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Lewisham Council failed to consult the mother of two autistic brothers properly when cutting their care plan, the Local Government and Social Care Ombudsman has found.

Both of the boys have autism and other special educational needs. Their care package included seven hours a week short break payments and 24 nights a year respite accommodation.

Both care packages were reduced on review – including the removal of the respite accommodation for the younger boy – without the mother having the chance to comment.

After she complained, the council took several months to respond properly, the ombudsman Michael King found. Continue reading “Lewisham Council rapped by Ombudsman for not consulting mother of autistic boys”

Parents denied chance to quiz mayoral hopefuls on Lewisham schools

Organisers criticise “shocking” cancellation and “high handed” London Labour Party

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Parents were unable to discuss Lewisham’s schools
The London Labour Party abruptly cancelled an event organised by a local education network this week, depriving parents from hearing the views of nine mayoral hopefuls.

The event, a panel focussed solely on education, was due to take place tonight in Lewisham Town Hall. More than 100 parents were expected to attend the discussion, organised by Parent ENGage Lewisham, to exchange views about the future of the area’s schools. While the borough has some of the most highly ranked primary schools in the country, a number of its secondary schools are at the opposite end of the spectrum.

Nine local politicians, most hoping to be on the ballot for the Lewisham mayoral elections, had confirmed their attendance, including two from the Liberal Democrat Party, the official Conservative Party mayoral candidate, a Green Party representative, and the five councillors shortlisted to be the Labour Party’s official candidate (unless voting patterns shift dramatically, the next Lewisham Mayor will almost certainly come from these five).

On Wednesday, however, the London Labour Party told organisers that no Labour candidate could attend. Permission to use the Civic Suite venue was also withdrawn, reportedly as no-one from the Labour Party would be present, and the event had to be cancelled.  No Labour candidate had requested the cancellation, according to Ali Craft of the Labour Party, who contacted organisers to inform them of the decision.

Nicky Dixon, a parent of two Lewisham schoolchildren and one of the education campaigners behind the event, said: “We weren’t given a reason. Just informed, out of the blue. It was quite shocking that Labour London felt it appropriate to do so, in such a high handed way, without discussion, when it was a public parent meeting.”

“Many parents thought that it was an extremely important meeting, especially as it would have given them the opportunity to hear from all candidates.”

Matthew Thomas, a Lewisham resident, father of three children, as well as a secondary school teacher in Bexley, had agreed to chair the event and told Lewisham Lately that the cancellation came as “a huge disappointment”. 

“I think we are owed a clear explanation,” he wrote in an email.

Ross Archer, announced as the official Conservative mayoral candidate in March, was due to attend. He described the cancellation as “shameless behaviour from a complacent and arrogant Labour Party. It shows they hold the residents of Lewisham in contempt.”

He added: “Lewisham’s secondary schools are rated among the worst in London… We need to have an open and honest discussion about how we can turn this around.”

The Liberal Democrat spokesperson for Lewisham Deptford, Bobby Dean, was also scheduled to take part. He told Lewisham Lately:

“It’s shocking that Labour have pulled the plug on this event at the very last moment. This was a community-driven democratic forum put together by hardworking and caring parents, who are rightly concerned about their children’s education in Lewisham.

“Our borough has been rated the worst in London for GCSE results. It seems that Labour are taking Lewisham for granted and it’s about time they are properly held to account.”

Paul Maslin, one of the five shortlisted Labour Party mayoral candidates, and the council’s current Cabinet Member for Children and Young People, said on Twitter: “We were all prepared to go. But I understand and support the Party’s decision.”

Lewisham Lately contacted the London Labour Party for an explanation of the decision to cancel the event but did not receive a response.

Lewisham’s chronically troubled secondary schools: parents fight back

Local mothers and fathers gain more of a voice in the fight to improve education in Lewisham

The performance of secondary schools in Lewisham is under the spotlight
The performance of secondary schools in Lewisham is under the spotlight

There have been a few developments since this blog’s first post on Lewisham’s chronically troubled secondary schools earlier this month.

Firstly, parents with children are due to start their secondary education in September found out their school allocation. Many did not get what they wanted (42.2 per cent to be precise). Some were distraught.

Then last weekend, a new network for parents of the borough had its first meeting. Speakers included Heidi Alexander, MP, and Nicky Dixon, a member of the Campaign for State Education for South-East London. Nicky is a parent of a pupil at Sedgehill School, a local secondary rated “inadequate” by Ofsted and subsequently forced to become an academy – yet still waiting for a sponsor.

Nicky reports on the meeting as below:

There was lots of interest in creating a Working Group and working together to support each other, the schools and create a much needed parent education voice within Lewisham.  

Parents have lost consultation rights by the Education & Adoption Act for schools rated Inadequate, Causing Concern or Coasting, and Lewisham does not consider parents as part of the Education equation (we are not involved in the Secondary Challenge, were not invited to share our views on Transition (transitioning between primary and secondary)).
This is the start of a new journey for Lewisham parents, and we need to spread the word to create a truly borough-wide parent network.

Nicky also encouraged people to sign the Fair Funding for All Schools Petition and  use its guidance to complete the National Funding Formula Consultation, which closes on March 22.

Meanwhile, in the House of Commons this week Heidi Alexander also mentioned Sedgehill and used education as her weapon of choice to attack the Government’s recent budget, calling its policy an “aspirational mirage”.  See the extended extracts below: Continue reading “Lewisham’s chronically troubled secondary schools: parents fight back”

Lewisham and its chronically troubled secondary schools

Primary education in Lewisham is outstanding. It’s a very different story for our secondary schools

 

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As noted elsewhere on this blog, the borough of Lewisham is abysmally served by the press. In a region of London with so much to report upon, both good and bad, there is very little effective probing into the issues that really matter to the residents of the area.

One of those issues is obviously education, a story on many parents’ minds today as secondary school places are announced. While the borough’s primary schools are among the best in the country, its secondary schools are an entirely different matter – so much so that the mayor agreed to the appointment of a Lewisham Education Commission, which compiled a report into the problems facing our secondary schools and suggested the best way forward.

It published its findings in April 2016. It’s surprising how few local parents seem to have heard of the report (perhaps related to the gaping void in media coverage referred to above). Its contents certainly do not pull any punches. Below, there are some of the key passages in the 98-page document, which as many parents as possible in the borough should read. In some instances, the situation has worsened since the time the report was pulled together. For example, the number of pupils going to good or outstanding schools has fallen markedly – Lewisham is now the lowest ranked of all London boroughs in this regard and has the dubious distinction of being one of the worst in the UK. Continue reading “Lewisham and its chronically troubled secondary schools”